Google Analytics II

Follow up to me previous post. I went to The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Google Analytics to see what they said. From that blog:

Here are just a few of the many questions about your website that you can answer using Google Analytics.

  • How many people visit my website?
  • Where do my visitors live?
  • Do I need a mobile-friendly website?
  • What websites send traffic to my website?
  • What marketing tactics drive the most traffic to my website?
  • Which pages on my website are the most popular?
  • How many visitors have I converted into leads or customers?
  • Where did my converting visitors come from and go on my website?
  • How can I improve my website’s speed?
  • What blog content do my visitors like the most?

I would like address each of those.

How many people visit my website?

You can get that from your server logs. The results are probably more accurate from your server logs, because a lot of people block the tracking cookie that Google Analytics uses.

Where do my visitors live?

Again you can get that from your server logs, but be aware that VPNs can obfuscate that data.

Do I need a mobile-friendly website?

The answer to that question is yes. But if you aren’t sure, you can use something like Google or Bing Webmaster tools to see what kind of devices people coming to your site through them use. It will like be over 50% mobile.

What websites send traffic to my website?

You can get that from your server logs, and from analytics techniques that do not require third party trackers.

What marketing tactics drive the most traffic to my website?

You can get that from analytics techniques that do not require third party trackers.

Which pages on my website are the most popular?

You can get that from your server logs.

How many visitors have I converted into leads or customers?

You can get that from analytics techniques that do not involve third party trackers, and honestly, it is better to get that from techniques that do not involve third party trackers. Do you want you competitors to know this information? No? Then why trust a third party to analyze it for you?

Where did my converting visitors come from and go on my website?

If that really matters as much as you think it does, you can get that using analytics techniques that do not involve third party trackers. And more accurate too, since a lot of users block Google Analytics.

How can I improve my website’s speed?

You do not need Google Analytics to find out where your bottlenecks are.

What blog content do my visitors like the most?

You can get that information by asking your visitors.


 

Well, There You Have It

It seems that Google Analytics is really just a trade of user privacy in exchange for webmaster laziness.

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